Diego Columbus: Adventures on the High Seas

Title: Diego Columbus – Adventure on the High Seas
Author: Marni McGee
Illustrator: Jim Hsieh
Pages: 128
Reading Level: 8 – 12
Star Rating: ★★

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A story about Christopher Columbus’ son – how fun! I thought.

The Story.

Diego Columbus is upset. He loves his father very much and is passionately invested in his plans for exploration, but no one else seems to take them seriously! Queen Isabella especially takes advantage of him – baiting him along with partial promises and false hopes.

But then, one day, just as the Columbuses are departing for France, the Queen calls them back to her palace. She offers them three ships and monetary support for their mission! Diego is ecstatic. But he’s also disgruntled – his father refuses to allow him to accompany him on the voyage.

Can Diego convince his father that he is old enough and strong enough to partake in this mission?

Discussion.

I was rather disappointed with this story. I came into it knowing that there would be some degree of tension between Diego and Christopher; after all, Diego wants to sail, Christopher refuses. I figured that this would occupy the first fourth of the story and, though annoying, would become buried in the fun and adventure of the last three-fourths – when Diego and Christopher sail together and explore America.

However.

Instead of occupying only a small portion of the story, this was the story. Now, Diego and Christopher’s disagreement is not savage – there are only two recorded arguments between them, in fact. But the entire plot of the story is how Diego is trying to outsmart his father and join the voyage at the Canary Islands. In order to do this, he sails on another ship which is scheduled to arrive at the Canary Islands at the same time as his father’s fleet, despite the fact that his father has forbidden him to go to sea due to his ill health. He evolves an elaborate scheme to stowaway on his father’s ship, but in the end he doesn’t have to use it because – oh, look how convenient – he unearths a mutiny plot and in gratitude his father allows him to sail.

Now, Diego’s rebellion is different from the typical kid-rebellion story – his rebellion isn’t rooted in a deep disrespect for his father’s person. Instead, he rebels precisely because he respects his father’s vision; he believes wholeheartedly in his father’s quest and wishes to offer his personal support on the quest – stand side by side with his father as he triumphs.

In several ridiculous scenes, Diego defends his father’s mission and convinces adults with his bold words.

After extricating himself from particularly stupid scrapes, Diego thanks God for rescuing him.

Fate and luck are mentioned.

Conclusion. Because it doesn’t focus on Columbus’s journey but rather on a personal (and entirely fictional) quest, I did not find Adventures on the High Seas to be particularly noteworthy.